The Book

Intrigued by tales of his parents' long-ago journey to the pre-revolutionary "Pearl of the Antilles," award-winning photographer Byron Motley traveled to Cuba more than a decade ago and instantly fell in love. Year after year he has returned with his camera to explore its vistas, its people, and its spirit.

Forgoing the political imagery that has dominated American media, Motley highlights the many ways in which Cubans retain and nourish their zest for life despite the scarcity of every day. Through his vivid photographs, readers discover the real Cuba: its heart-stopping architecture and infectious energy, its cars seemingly teleported from the past, its love of baseball so fierce as to be nearly religious, the joy of community, and the unexpected juxtapositions of life in the last bastion of communism in the Western world.

Even before the easing of travel restrictions, Motley's personal relationships with key dignitaries provided him with unprecedented access in Havana, allowing him to capture the allure, the mystique, and the vibrant essence of Cuba.



“Motley’s photographs are vivid, varied and beautiful. This is a perfect coffee table or gift book”. —Manhattan Book Review


"These beautiful photographs bring back many memories of Cuba--my people, my childhood, and so many beautiful moments that passed growing up in my beloved land.” —Yasiel Puig, Los Angeles Dodgers all-star outfielder



“Anyone who has the pleasure of perusing the arresting pages in this righton-time photograph album will see the source of our enthusiasm. . . View and enjoy these sensitive photos, and bon voyage”. —Booklist
 

“Motley’s combined photographic and narrative skills create a succinct and evocative journey that transports the reader into those sides of island life and legacy that engage him most powerfully. . . . The result is this stunning visual and heart-felt narrative of Cuba in all its major dimensions”. — INsights



“Through [Motley’s] vivid photographs, readers discover the real Cuba, its heart-stopping architecture and infectious energy, its cars seemingly teleported from the past, its love of baseball so fierce as to be nearly religious, the joy of community, and the unexpected juxtaposition of life in the last bastion of communism in the Western world”. — McCormick Messenger